NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION

FOR FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT

Woodbridge, NJ - Residents fleeing a "slow-motion disaster"

Thursday, December 26, 2019 2:13 PM | Gregory Westfall (Administrator)
Source:   

https://pressfrom.info/us/news/us/-369781-in-new-jersey-a-slow-motion-evacuation-from-climate-change.html

Woodbridge - Residents Fleeing a "Slow-Motion Disaster"  

By Wayne Parry and Ted Shaffrey - Associated Press   


A flood-plain forest grows now where there used to be houses in the Watson Crampton neighborhood in Woodbridge, N.J., as seen from the air on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. The Heards Brook on the top meets the Woodbridge River on the left, which leads to the Atlantic Ocean. Homeowners here took buyouts through a program that purchases houses and demolishes them to remove people from danger and to help absorb water from rising sea levels due to climate change. 

A demolition crew takes down a house in Woodbridge, N.J., on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. The homeowner took a buyout through a program that purchases houses, demolishes them and returns the land to wild grass and trees to help absorb the water from rising sea levels due to climate change. 

A worker sprays water to stop the spread of dust as a demolition crew takes down a house in Woodbridge, N.J., on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. The homeowner took a buyout through a program that purchases houses, demolishes them and returns the land to wild grass and trees to help absorb the water from rising sea levels due to climate change. 

Biologist Brooke Maslo of Rutgers University stands in the flood plain forest she designed in the Watson Crampton neighborhood in Woodbridge, N.J., on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Plastic tubes that protect and nurture growing trees and wild grass stand where houses once stood.

A demolition crew takes down a house in Woodbridge, N.J., on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. The homeowner took a buyout through a program that purchases houses, demolishes them and returns the land to wild grass and trees to help absorb the water from rising sea levels due to climate change. 

A flood-plain forest now grows where there used to be houses in the Watson Crampton neighborhood in Woodbridge, N.J., on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. The Woodbridge River leads to the Atlantic Ocean. One hundred and forty five homes have been demolished and returned to nature in Woodbridge since 2013. 

Housing is in high demand in the heavily populated northeastern United States. But in Woodbridge, New Jersey, the state has bought and torn down 145 homes since 2013 and returned the land to nature, with eight homes demolished this month alone. Dozens more are slated to be torn down in the near future.

Some neighborhoods in this town of over 100,000 residents just off the bustling New Jersey Turnpike are projected to be partly or fully underwater in coming decades as global sea levels rise.

Earlier this month, Patricia Kambach, 80, went inside rather than watch a crew demolish her longtime neighbor's home. Kambach has lived in her house on Lewis Street since John F. Kennedy was president.

"I lived here 56 years and it's hard," said Kambach, as she watched an enormous excavator machine used to tear down houses.

“A lot of people are taking the buyout because they are getting good price for their house and we do have problems with the water,” she said. Soon she will move out, and her home will be demolished.



Website Issues? Contact Us

New Jersey Association For Floodplain Management
P.O. Box 1326 Trenton, New Jersey 08607

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software